People sitting on a city bus.

Sociologists systematically investigate the causes of social problems and how people make meaning collectively using both quantitative (statistical) and qualitative techniques. Sociologists are curious about the hows and whys of human social life.  Sociological perspectives and methods have many applications: in non-profit organizations, marketing departments, criminal justice organizations,  public health agencies, and many other academic disciplines. Sociological knowledge helps businesses, policy makers, and the public navigate the complex social and cultural structures that shape everyday life.

A Bachelor of Arts with a major in Sociology consists of 30 credits including introductory courses, the fundamentals of research and theory, and more in-depth coursework that leads to a capstone experience. The capstone, taken during the senior year, allows students to choose between a professional internship, a research oriented course, or an honor's thesis if they qualify.

Sociology at Mizzou offers students the opportunity for in-depth study of some of the big questions and problems of the 21st century: culture and identities, justice, social inequalities, and health and environment. Sociologists are involved in analyzing some of the most critical issues of the contemporary world: class, race and gender oppression, sex and gender diversity, and global issues like health disparities and climate change. Sociologists empirically study these issues not simply to understand them, but to help create a more just society through the production of evidence-based knowledge. Sociology majors gain key skills necessary for today’s careers, including critical thinking, global/intercultural fluency, teamwork, and oral and written communication. Sociology majors also build cultural literacy that helps them understand current events and their own place in history.