Communication students navigate rich environments using communication theories and models, critically evaluate messages and arguments, and effectively advocate their values, beliefs, and opinions using communication principles. Graduates are able to create persuasive messages for a variety of contexts using verbal and nonverbal, written, and mediated communication. The curriculum for the degree covers four main areas: interpersonal, mass media, organizational, and political communication. Students are asked to specialize in one area but are required to explore two additional areas. Interpersonal and family communication focuses on communication processes in family and personal relationships. The mass media area studies theory and research related to media content and use, media effects, and audience reception. Students in this area have the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in digital production. Organizational communication focuses on the various ways in which we produce, enact, and generally conduct our lives in various organizational contexts. Political communication studies the communicative activity of citizens, political figures and campaigns, government institutions, and social movements. Professional internships and two undergraduate organizations are offered and student participation is strongly encouraged. A degree in Communication is not intended to provide specific vocational training, but to prepare students for professional opportunities requiring active communication skills. Recent graduates have found careers in sales, public relations, marketing, advertising, promotions, political consulting, corporate communications, event planning, social media, media production, law, education, and public policy.