Mississippian (AD 900 – mid 1500s) ceramic effigy vessels.

Anthropology is the study of humans and human experience, past and present. Anthropology emphasizes scientific approaches to the study of human biology, behavior, culture, and evolution. Anthropology majors are required to take core courses in all three focal areas of the discipline (archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology) but may concentrate in one or more of these fields. Students have opportunities to become involved in research, helping them develop creativity, enhance critical thinking skills, solve problems and improve their writing. Undergraduate training in anthropology also prepares students for work in government (both in the United States and abroad), museum positions, and field positions in archaeology, ethnography, human paleontology, or forensics. It may also provide students with the opportunity to enter graduate school leading towards an academic career teaching and conducting anthropological research at a college or university. A degree in anthropology also provides students with the background to pursue careers in business, journalism, health care, law, and many other fields.

Photo by Shane Epping, Mizzou Creative